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. christmas break is already over for president obama. he's flying back to washington tonight and aides say he's ready for a deal. it's not clear whether this trip is a sign of compromises to come or another display of theater showing the president is willing to work even as his opponents skip town. meanwhile, though, americans are growing skeptical. in the last week alone, gallup found a 15-point drop in the number of americans who think congress will negotiate a deal on the fiscal cliff. that's not all, holiday spending also hit its lowest rate since the 2008 recession, which retailers are blaming on the uncertainty in washington. so where do we go from here? well, since the house failed to get a vote on the tax package last week, all eyes are on the senate. a temporary deal that would basically extend all the tax cuts for those making under a quarter million. the deal would also rescue long-term unemployment benefits and instead of addressing those automatic spending cuts we've all heard about that are set for january 1st, this temporary deal would delay them for another six months. few are
have big news out of washington, where nothing is happening. the house is not in session, and as of this moment has no plans to be in session for the end of the year. nothing is stirring, not even harry reid. yes, i'm still in the christmas spirit. the president meanwhile is in hawaii and won't be returning until tomorrow. now, normally nothing happening would not be big news in washington. nothing happening is kind of the status quo in washington. getting nothing done is to our political system as saying great is to tony the tiger. it's just kind of what we do now. right now, this week, nothing happening is huge news. the reason is that usually when washington doesn't do anything nothing happens. you do nothing, nothing happens. that's how it goes. in fact that's why people call it doing nothing. after you do it, nothing occurs. if washington doesn't do something, a lot happens. all the bush tax cuts expire, the payroll tax cuts expire. doctors participating in medicare, see their reimbursements cut by more than 25%. good luck getting a doctor then. more than a trillion
of it is prevalent in the papers. wednesday with congress and the president heading back to washington. here is a headline on "usa today." in the wall street journal -- if the in "the washington post." we welcome your phone calls. we will get to them in a moment. we did find another piece at politico. there you have it in the papers this morning about people being optimistic or pessimistic about things. i want to dig a little bit deeper into "the wall street journal" piece. i we will probably see some what of a flurry of activity tomorrow. if first call. what is your name and where are you calling from? i think that caller is gone. let's try the next call. caller: i am optimistic because this is a great country. we are one nation under god that. i think people ought to turn to their faith during these times because we have always needed to through hard times. host: how will this play in washington but the fiscal glove? caller: i think the republicans are going to have to give it more than the democrats. president obama is basically going to do with the people voted him in for. i think he wil
of the sheriff. >> just broken. >> washington was -- washington barely ran for a second term because he was so tired of being criticized. adams was defeated. jefferson left under a huge cloud. truman is the modern example of every president who gets in trouble wants to be truman because it means history implicates you, right? one of the things that happened was watergate. and it took 30 years, maybe a little bit less, but truman -- remember that one-man show -- >> the merle miller one? >> the plain speaking -- but there was a one-man show that went on just as watergate was breaking. and truman had the great good fortune of having disliked richard nixon early and had a lot of quotations about it. and he suddenly, as faith in the public sector is falling in the early '70s, all the examples you're talking about with truman are looking better and better. a president who, as evan wrote about the wise men, he was the popular embodiment of an american willingness to project power and to stand guard over a really complicated dark world. >> by the way, during the mid'70s, also, even chicago, the band c
washington" john boehner plus plan collapses and the house goes home for christmas. >> it is hard to wrap your mind around it but someone so young in such a peaceful community over such an ardent a bent pin down another massacre and another called for gun-control. >> the fact that this problem is complex can no longer be an excuse for doing nothing. >> handle after the state department report on benghazi, but are they the right ones? >> the security posture of the compound was inadequate for the threat environment, and in fact, grossly inadequate to deal with the attack which took place that night. >> will former republican senator chuck kagel and make it to the pentagon? >> the house did not take up the tax measure today because it did on have sufficient support from our members to pass. house speaker john boehner's statement thursday evening as he stood in print of the republican conference, he recited the serenity prayer. god, grant me the serenity to accept the things which i cannot change and close the house for business until after christmas. there is no place like an empty house fo
up with. statements from the founding fathers about our guns. toward washington. -- george washington. try to stop gun sales in this country, you will run into a series of roadblocks. >> australia had a mass killing in the mid-1990s and they passed a severe loss where all existing guns had to be turned in. the government bought them back. after a certain date if they were in your home, you were arrested. they have had a decrease in crime and suicide, which is an interesting development. it seems to me, you either have to go that route, which you cannot in the u.s. -- gun ownership in australia was 5% of households. gallup has shown is 47% here. we have the second amendment and the history back to washington. given that we are a different culture, the kinds of laws that we pass are almost always an effective as a result, because there are 300 million weapons out there today. unless you recall them the way that australia did, and we cannot do that -- you would have a reservoir that would last 100 years. >> you can imagine what would happen. there would be an insurrection. >> you do not
in the washington area this morning. because at starbucks, in the washington, d.c., area at each of the starbucks locations, they write on the cups, "come together." it's sort of an impetus to maybe get these bozos in the house and the senate to come together in the fiscal cliff. we're going to be talking about the starbucks effort a little later in the show. good morning, ladies and gentlemen. >> good morning. >> good morning. it's thursday, december 27th. i'm mike barnicle in for joe, mika and willie. joining the table, we have political editor and white house correspondent for the huffington post, sam stein. >> hi. >> applause for sam. "fortune's" assistant managing editor, leigh gallagher. and the president of the council on foreign relations, author of "foreign policy begins at home: the case for putting america's house in order." and in washington, vice president and executive editor of msnbc.com and msnbc political analyst, richard wolffe. a minor round of applause for richard wolffe. >> one hand clapping. >> first of all, can anybody here come up with a synonym -- i don't care what it is
of the fiscal cliff. the senate back in session but so far all that is getting debated in washington is who is at fault. >> we wanted an agreement. but we had no takers. >> millions of middle class families are nervously watching and waiting and counting down the moments. >> harris: and we don't have many moments left. tonight, the president back in washington. will they cut a last minute deal. and if washington can't get it done we could feel the pinch in our first pay check of the new year. snow and sleet making for some very dangerous driving. >> i have seen ten cars in an accident. >> i saw a jackknifed tractor trailer. >> i saw a lexus fly into a ditch. it is pretty slippery out there. >> and flying not much better. >> we got on the plane and sat for three hours. >> harris: tonight, a monster storm on the move. i'm harris faulkner in tonight for shepard smith. the impending fiscal cliff that stands to affect the first pay check you get next month unless, of course, lawmakers can find a solution. today the senate majority leader mitch mcconnell said there is still time to work out a dea
. >> there's another point where you talk about the civilians in washington seeing too many rambo movies. >> there was an element pressuring, i felt, for us to take action when we were not prepared to do that. and that, frankly, as early as november, i was called mccollum. >> general george mccollum. >> yeah, because they saw a civil war series where he sits outside and won't attack lee. so schwarzkopf was referred to him. >> who is they? >> i don't know. i mean it. everyone comes after me and says name names. you know why i don't know name? because colin powell had the good sense not to give it to me. people in the national security counsel i don't know if -- colin was relaying to me what was going on in washington. we were trading information back and forth. when this came up i got burned. this guy who watches the pbs series and he is operations -- schooled in the operational arts and is going to explain to schwarzkopf how to run war. this guy is so stupid. there is a big difference. he had outnumbered lee 10:1 and at the time we were outnumbered 3:1. i said to colin, i said who is the
as a powerful intelligence tool. then with washington mired in political gridlock we take a closer look at the last great senate. but first, the nonpartisan stimson center recently released a report, a new u.s. defense strategy for a new era that outlines four approaches for cutting defense spending but maintaining capability. stimson's co-founder barry blechman spearheaded the study. the report has become a must- read for anyone involved in the coming defense review or budget planning team. barry, welcome to the team. >> thank you, vag go. >> congratulations for your slot on the defense news top 100 most influential people. >> that was the biggest thrill of the year. >> so let's start off with the report. each report begins with assumptions about threats to the united states to be facing and what's going to be needed to meet them what. are those threats and what's the right strategy to address those threats as cost efficiently as possible? >> the group was more optimistic than many people in looking at the world. they see russia as a country that doesn't pose any threats now and really
and specified commands. they have indeed greatly increased staffs and they even have elements in washington that begin to act like lobbies. when a new problem arises, a joint task force is put together. and that makes sense. and the elements may come from more than one of the unified and specified commands. so i think another look is needed at not at the question of jointness, but at how it's carried out. and how the overhead is distributed. >> you worked in the pentagon during the vietnam war and there are those and you even mentioned certain parallels between the vietnam conflict and what we're seeing in afghanistan. right now there's a big debate going on in washington whether or not troop levels should remain high to ensure that we can train the afghans fast enough to hand over control before we leave at the end of 2014. why is that a bad idea from your standpoint? >> the real question is what kind of country is going to -- will it be possible to leave behind? and the case of vietnam, my own conclusion back in period of 1967, '68, became that the government there was unsustainable becau
ideas. >> the house will stand in the chair. >> this week on "inside washington," john boehner's plan b collapses and the house goes home for christmas. >> it is hard to get your mind around said that someone so young could leave us, and such a peaceful community, such an horrific event. >> another massacre and another called for gun-control. >> the fact of this problem is complex can no longer be an excuse for doing nothing. >> hands brawl after the state department report on benghazi, but are they the right hands? >> the compound was inadequate for the threat environment in benghazi, and in fact, grossly inadequate to deal with the attacks that took place that night. >> will former republican senator chuck hagel make it to the pentagon? >> the house did not take up the tax measure today because it did not have sufficient support from our members to pass. house speaker john boehner's statement on thursday evening as he stood in front of the house republican conference on thursday night, he recited the serenity prayer. god, grant me the serenity to accept the things that i cannot change
falling as concern mounts that washington will fail to get a budget deal. the dow jones industrial average lost 158 points today, to close at 12,938. the nasdaq fell 25 points to close at 2,960. for the week, both the dow and the nasdaq fell 2%. sectarian tensions flared across iraq today as tens of thousands of sunnis staged mass protests against the shi-ite-led government. there were rallies in fallujah and ramadi, where protests already had erupted earlier this week. today, mosul, tikrit and samarra had demonstrations as well. protesters took to the streets waving flags and signs. they chanted slogans demanding fair treatment from the baghdad regime, and the release of sunni prisoners. shi-ite prime minister nouri al-maliki said the demonstrations were not acceptable. the government of china imposed tighter controls on internet usage today. now, china's 500 million web users will have to provide their real names when they register for internet service. and providers must delete any web content deemed illegal, and report it to authorities. leading writers and bloggers insisted it's a ne
to go up. but we only run the house. democrats continue to run washington. >> call me a hopeless optimist, but i actually still think we can get it done. >> eamon javers live in washington. eamon, fascinating to look at that tape in retrospect. >> i think a lot of people in washington think the make-or-break deal making sessions have already happened here. and one republican senator i talked to this morning said there are very low expectations now for this meeting at the white house today. and boy, how times have changed, carl. just watching that tape that you just ran. one of the things that i'll be watching for when i'm standing on the white house north lawn this afternoon is whether or not these four congressional leaders come out as they did back in november and talk to the press after the meeting. we've had a lot of meetings at the white house where people have left very quickly, gotten into a suv and driven off the complex without talking to reporters. if they come out to those microphones after this meeting and come out together, i think that will be a hopeful sign that pe
of u.s. security agents. benghazi, tripoli and washington coordinated effectively with each other on the night of the attacks. the interagency response was timely and appropriate. but there was not enough time for u.s. military forces to have made a difference. having said that, it is not reasonable nor feasible to tether u.s. forces at the ready to respond to protect every high risk post in the world. we have found that there was no immediate tactical warning of the september 11 attacks. if there was a knowledge gap in the intelligence community's en understanding of extremist militias in benghazi -- in this context, increased violence .ailed to com we did not find that any individual u.s. government employee engaged in willful misconduct or knowingly ignored his or her responsibilities. we did conclude that certain state department bureau level senior officials in critical positions of authority and responsibility in washington demonstrate a lack of leadership and management ability a program for senior ranks and their responses to security concerns posed by the special mission.
: it was founded to promote liberty and economic freedom, starting in san francisco, and then move into washington, d.c. milton friedman admitted the kindle institute has never sold out. we still work for liberty and freedom. i've been working with the cato institute since 1995 and full time since 2007. host: mary, fort washington, maryland. democrat. caller: i would suggest thinking that if you follow all of the problems come at the end of the trail you will find the smiling grin of greed. that is what i think caused it. for myself, naca program helped us, taking us out of the ugly arm. my mortgage is $964 a month, which will allow us to stay in our home comfortably. guest: people blame things like a financial crisis on greed, but greed is not changing. it has been with us for hundreds of thousands of years. people are greedy naturally. if we design institutions assuming people are altruistic, we will get hurt. we have to assume they are greedy, and if there altruistic, we will only benefit from that. we assume that people want to live in their own home, and give people a choice, buying or rentin
's what i thought i want to say. in washington so often as you know, sam, from covering the white house, you have the pseudo-events where people come out and say now is the time where i'm going to sound reasonable. >> yes. >> and that's the goal of the day. even though they don't give up. >> that was what was news about this coverage. >> did he soubd reasonable to you? >> not at all. he trolled the press corps. he didn't even take questions. he wanted cameras on him and say exactly the same thing that the nra says after gun violence. this is the media's fault. this is hollywood's fault. >> let me bring back michael. let's put aside your substantive disagreement with the nra. >> sure. >> were you surprised that he sounded cold rather than compassionate about this terrible mass murder? >> sure. you are asking me to be strategic for him, and i will. look, you step up to the podium, and you say this is an american tragedy. what happened, no party to this can in any fashion acknowledge that it was good. it was bad. now, i understand that you have a problem with my industry, and i get that. i
and the political class here in washington d.c. so consumed by fear and hatred of the n.r.a. and american gun owners that you're willing to accept a world where real resistence to evil monssters is alone, unarmed, school principal left to vender her life, her life to shield those children in her care? no one, no one regardless of personal, political prejudice has the right to impose that sacrifice. ladies and gentlemen, there's no national one side fits all solution to protecting our children. but do know this president see road out school emergency planning grants in last year's budget and scrapped secure our schools policing grants in next year's budget. with all the foreign aid the united states does, with all the money in the federal budget, can't we afford to put a police officer in every single school? even if they did that, politicians have no business and no authority denying us the right, the ability and the moral imperative to protect ourselves and our loved ones from harm. now the national rifle association knows there are millions of qualified active and retired police. active reserve an
in particular caused washington to give unusual deference to his judgment. while the report concludes that there were systemic failures at senior levels of the state department, significantly it does not make any formal recommendations for discipline airy action, bill. bill: what else should we know that's in there, catherine? >> reporter: well the missing piece really, and this is the critical policy piece, is why it was that the obama administration specifically, the secretary of state, advocated for this light footprint on the ground in benghazi when the intelligence seemed to suggest otherwise? secretary clinton will not be testifying this week citing doctors orders she remain at home as she recovers from this concussion. instead we'll hear from two of her deputies. >> when you hear the testimony of deputy secretary burns and deputy secretary nines remind they are standing in for her, so the testimony they give on thursday will very much reflect her view and how we should two forward from this report and how we should learn its lesson. >> reporter: two main takeaways here that sec
cliff deal. and is it mitch mcconnell to the rescue. live in washington on the 11th hour negotiations. >> and did you know about to fall off the dairy cliff? >> juliet: have you seen the prices? >> dave: as high as 8 bucks a gallon for milk. >> clayton: oak ridge boys bush. special number tribute for number 41. "fox & friends" begins right now. >> am i wrong about that don't the have a deep voice? ♪ >> oak ridge boys have been on this show many times on "fox & friends." >> good morning, everyone. >> dave: good morning. juliet huddy celebrating an early new year's eve. is it new year's eve? >> juliet: sparkly shoes and everything. i feel like we are waking up at 4:00 in the morning on saturday i better be festive. >> clayton: that's what woke me up this morning. >> juliet: this is a beautiful set it has inspired me. >> dave: it's spectacular. >> juliet: it is. >> dave: it's fiscal cliff time. couple of days away. rare i wake up and say i'm moderately optimistic but that's what the president said. you are either optimistic or you are not. the president said he is modestly optimistic a
to washington as often, and i would say, even more often than the alaska members in the house and senate. he made -- they made a point to stop by his office on a regular occasion to talk to him about what has happened in the past, what's going on today, and what they look for in the future. earlier this year, senator inouye was in alaska at my invitation, his last trip to alaska. he told them a memorable story about his support of the trans alaska oil pipeline, which was controversial when he supported it in its construction. now, senator inouye has a unique style of how to tell stories, and you got to just pay attention and listen. they're no very to the point. senator inouye told this story told by opponents of the pipe lynn that it would -- of the pipeline that it would destroy the caribou. this was what he would told over and over again. again in his last trip, he was in front of a group of people, and i was anxious as he started to tawfnlg he said, i have this story tell you. he talked about this time of controversy about the alaska north slope and the oil pipeline and the caribou and w
diplomatic security spending by $1.3 billion. you know, in washington where too often we see recommendations of blue ribbon panels ignored, delayed, or deferred as they were for a long time even on the 9/11 commission, i think the secretary's swift action underscores how determined she is to apply the lessons of benghazi. clearly, mistakes were made, and we see -- we learned of those yesterday and in very stark terms about the mistakes leading up to the attack. the report makes that very clerks and one of the most candid and important observations was the failure by certain leaders to see the forest through the trees. there were clear warning signs that security situation in libya deteriorated, and going forward, it is important, and i think it's important for all of us to think in terms of going forward, that we need to do better jobs of ensuring a free and open dialogue among ambassadors, their security personnel, and officials in washington where decisions on security staffing levels and funding are made. now, as we draw the lessons, i want to be crystal clear about something else. congre
are seeing businesses and consumers hold back because of the dysfunction they see in washington. economists, business leaders think we are poised to grow in 2013 as long as politics in washington do not get in the way of america's progress. we've got to get this done. i want to repeat -- we had a constructive meeting today. senators reid and mcconnell are discussing a potential agreement or we can get a bipartisan bill out of the senate over to the house and done in a timely fashion so we met the december 31 deadline. given how things have been working in this town, we always have to wait and see until it actually happens. the one thing the american people should not have to wait and see is some sort of action, so if we do not see an agreement between the two leaders in the senate, i expect a bill to go on the floor -- i have asked senator reid to do this -- put a bill on the floor of that make sure taxes on the middle class does not go up, that unemployment insurance is available for 2 million people, and it lays the groundwork for additional deficit reduction and economic growth steps tha
-dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. listen, washington has got a spending problem not a revenue problem. if the president doesn't agree with our proposal i believe that he's got an obligation to families and small businesses to offer a plan of his own, a plan that can pass both chambers of the congress. we are ready and eager to talk to the president about such a plan. >> you did speak with the president earlier this week, can you characterize that call? did he have any kind of counter offer? also, we understand that he is making clear that it's got to be increase in rates for the wealthy or no deal. are you willing to give a little bit maybe not all the way to 39.6? >> the phone call was pleasant, just more of the same. the conversations that the staff had yesterday, just more of the same. it's time for the president, if he's serious, to come back to us with a counter offer. >> the jobs report today indicated unemployment is down roughly a full point from this time last year. a lot of folks in the business community say if no deal is going to happen it could obviously hurt american job
shoreman did not. this from the federal mediator in washington. "the container royalty payment issue has been agreed upon in principle by the parties subject to achieving an overall collective bargaining agreement. this allege saves americans from higher prices for many consumer goods. all of which would have been in short supply. as a strike would have frozen stack upon stack of containers. electronic. auto parts, airline part. computer component, tiles, manufacturered good, clothing not just things coming in from all over the world but also the u.s. products meant to sell overseas. >> so it's not just the local port area affected by the strike but the entire region and the state. going nationally as well. >> from boston to houston, these ports represent hundreds of billions of dollars worth of consumer goods that flow for distribution thousands of miles inland. thanks to both sides reaching a nearly last-minute agreement, none will see the picket signs sunday. >> economist worried if we do go off the fiscal cliff, it's now averted strike would have combined for a deadly one-two punch t
'm andrea mitchell live in washington where we are expecting to see the first major announcement for president obama's second term. his cabinet choices. this hour the official selection of john kerry as the futures face of the state department. former president bill clinton departing that memorial service. the funeral for senator inouye moments ago with president obama taking time to speak with senator kerry after the service. joining me now for our daily fix chris alissa, msnbc managing editor of post politics.com jeffrey goldberg, national correspondent for the atlantic washington bureau chief susan page, and the "new york times" white house correspondent mark lamb berg. let's talk about the pick of john kerry. we knew it was coming. the timing is interesting. they wanted to do this before christmas, but then we thought it was going to be after christmas, even from the kerry people. how did this all come together for today? >> i think the white house, andrea, wanted to get one of these announcements out the door before the christmas holiday and given that this was the worst kep
colleague from washington, mr. reichert, who knows firsthand the power of d.n.a. evidence from his years as a sheriff. and finally and most importantly, katie's family and her mother. she has endured every parent's worst nightmare. her determination and dedication are inspiring and when katie's law is signed into law, and it will be, it will be a testament to her work and her love for her daughter. mr. speaker, i urge the house to pass katie's law and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. smith: mr. speaker, i yield four minutes to the gentleman from new mexico, mr. pearce. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new mexico is recognized for four minutes. mr. pearce: i thank the gentleman from texas for yielding and i thank the gentleman from california, mr. schiff, for his leadership on this. i rise in strong support of h.r. 6014 today. katie sepich, her picture her here, tells us a lot. she was fun-loving, vibrant, outgoing. she was a leader in our age group. she made things happen. kati
's rooms, washington, d.c. december 24, 2012. i hereby appoint the honorable mac thornberry to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: the brare will be offered by our chaplain, father conroy. chaplain conroy: god of light, we give you thanks for giving us another day, as this chamber lies silent, we pray for joy, hope, and love within the homes of the members of the people's house. send us your spirit so that there might be peace on earth, good will among all men and women. all that is done this day be for your great honor and glory. amen. the speaker pro tempore: the chair has examined the journal of the last day's proceedings and announces to the house his approval thereof. pursuant to clause 1 of rule 1, the journal stands approved. the share will lead the house in the pledge of allegiance. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the chair lays before the h
, and doing some speaking but staying as far from washington, d.c. as i can. >> rose: when you look at writing a book, i mean, how hard is that for you to take the time anand think of all of the events and make sure that you get it right as you recollect it? >> first i have given myself a little out at the beginning by saying this is a purely personal reminiscence of what i experienced and what i saw, i am not trying to write the defensive history and others will have a different perspective on things, but it was -- we were at war every day of the four and a half years i was in office, and as i write in the book it wasn't just the wars in iraq and afghanistan, it was daily wars with the congress, with other agencies, with the white house, and also i would say with my own building, with the pentagon. >> rose: fighting over what within the pentagon? >> trying to make the first priority of the pentagon to be successful in the wars we were already in, the pentagon bureaucracy is structured to plan for war, not to wage war, and so getting badly needed equipment to the troops fast in months rather t
was described as an antidote and he promised to deliver. he practiced international trade law and washington. on behalf of the west virginia state society, i would like to introduce ira shapiro. thank you. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. thank you to the society for giving me the chance to be here. thanks to mike who did so much to organize the event. he is an old friend. thank you, mike. i'm delighted to be here today with corbin. -- david corbin. we have two books that talk about robert byrd from different perspectives. my book is basically about the senate and the last great senate as i refer to it. senator byrd was the majority leader during the period of time i wrote about. it gives you an ensemble sense of how the senate works. the book originated in 2008. i had been in the senate in the 1970s and 1980s. by 2008, i decided the senate had become utterly unrecognizable to me. polarized and paralyzed, really quite dysfunctional. i decided to write a book about the senate when it was great, specifically when i was there. [laughter] when you do something like that, you ha
the department of defense, they'll have 1600 of the collectors according to the washington post, there are already around 500 case officers at the defense intelligence agency. gathers tension for the military by 2018. they'll have about a thousand and that number will keep growing as the defense intelligence agency transitions over to the new dcs spies will be trained by the cia, but unlike the cia, the dcs is not going to be able to do anything, but gath gather intelligence, political sabotage and drone strikes continue to be cia operations and of dcs, focus on i.d.ing targets. and in recent months, those priorities have been keeping tabs on problem areas like africa, iran, north korea and even the strengthening military in china. this was signed off on by the defense secretary, leon panetta who used to be a cia chief and by general david petraeus who stepped down as cia chief after an extramarital affair was exposed last month, as for funding, the pentagon gave the dcs about 100 million dollars just to get the program started, but their overall budget is not expected to grow.
tonight i yield whatever time she might want to take to our colleague from the great state of washington -- hawaii. ms. hanabusa: thank you very much to the gentleman from california. i'm here to honor a state which is unique and as special as the person i honor. the person i rise to honor is daniel k. inouye. a person who cannot be described by a single adjective. a person whose accomplishments would cause you to pause and say, is this one person? is this one man? a person was awarded the greatest honor anyone who serves in the military can achieve, the congressional medal of honor. but it was an honor about 55 years late. from a country that questioned his loyalty due to the fact that he was an american of japanese ancestry. a person who could not get a hair cut after being severely wounded and giving -- and given his arm in battle because he looked like the enemy. a person who insisted that instead of being bitter he would dedicate his life to doing all he can to right social inequities and description of all kinds -- discrimination of all kinds. to do this he became part of the democ
period. host: you can continue the conversation online and tomorrow on washington journal. we'll be talking about this 7:00 a.m. eastern. you can send us your tweets and check out what others have to say at cspan.org/fiscal cliff. the news of the evening the house is out until past christmas and that's because they pulled the plan b fiscal cliff bill and speaker boehner saying he did not have the support to pass that bill. up next we will bring you some of the floor debate on the bill that did pass, the bill that did pass and replaces the spending cuts from other agencies. >> and by every small business owner looking to expand and hire. we have passed bills and put forward reforms that would save programs like social security, medicare and medicaid from certain and predictable failure. yet we cannot find cooperation mr. speaker from the white house or the other side of the aisle to help solve these problems. it is unfornl that we find ourselves in this place just 11 days from the new year. for months we have been ready and willing to work with the president to prevent the fisc
negotiations in washington. we will show you remarks from president obama at the white house and senate majority leader harry reid and mitch mcconnell on the senate floor. first, an update on where negotiations stand after the meeting between president and congressional leaders at the white house. >> steven dennis joins us from the role call as a white house reporter. stephen, how did the meeting between the president and congressional leaders go? >> i think it was a meeting where they may be set the framework for getting a short- term deal to avert tax increases for most americans, extend unemployment benefits, and maybe take care of a few other small things. at this point, it is a race against the clock and it is up to harry reid and mitch mcconnell and the senate to see if they can have a bipartisan compromise. the president said if he cannot come up with something in the next couple days, he wants harry reid to bring a bill to the floor that would do with the president wants to do, which is tax increases, extend unemployment benefits, etcetera, at least get a vote on it. harry reid
's ecowas write the book. i have a lot practiced in washington for many years. i felt ultimately that i would put it together and piece it together. a magazine article and it expanded and it became what it is right now. always in my mind, i want young people to know. i want young people to know the this happened and so it took a while. my brother is a writer in new york and he was my editor for a while. i fired him three times, and i went back with the help of my wife, back into my first year of legal research because i had to certify, authorize this piece of nonfiction. i felt with a memoir you could just wing it you can't because once you start highlighting things you've got to get authority for it. you even have to get consent from the people that you put photographs and. i had a letter from james meredith right after i left, which is in the book itself and i wanted to put that in. my wife reminded me, we need his permission. i don't need his permission. he sent it to me that he didn't send us the world. i send a form letter to jackson mississippi and he signed it on the backside of
eisenhower. he's introduced by susan eisenhower, granddaughter at the eisenhower institute in washington d.c. this is about 50 minutes. [applause] >> what an honor and treat to be at the eisenhower institute and especially an honor to have susan introduced me. you know, families can be a little touchy about the great man and their family, but the eisenhower's were amazing with me. john, susan, david are completely open, not defensive, which is unusual. incredibly helpful and i could not have done this book without them. so thank you, susan. six weeks after dwight eisenhower became president, stalin died. paik caught together top advisers and officials in that, what's the plan? .. is >> little bit like colonel sanders of kentucky fried chicken. was clearly a figure. ike was rooting for the general, the head of the red army was ike's ally in defeating the nazis in world war ii. eisenhower sent his son john out to do a little spying. john seidel up to him. things are not as they seem. president eisenhower did not find out who was really in charge until the fifth day of the conference, when ik
eisenhower the granddaughter of the dwight eisenhower at the eisenhower institute in washington d.c.. this is about 50 minutes. .. >> the answer was there is no plan. i blew up, not for the first or last time, and said, how can it be the head of the soviet union dies, and we have no contingency plan. it was criminal, said the president. the truth was the united states and the other western nations had very little idea of what was happening behind the iron curtain. two years later at the first summit meeting of the cold war era at geneva in 1955, the united states still did not know who was running the soviet union. they sent four leaders, one tall white man in a white suit with a white goatee who looked like colonel sanders from kentucky fried chicken, clearly, a figure head. the head of the red army, ike's ally in defeating the nazis in world war ii. eisenhower spent his son, john, to do some spying. subdued and shaken, just whispered, "things are not as they seem." presidentize -- president eisenhower found out who was in charge on the fifth day of the conference. the big pier o
on a nuclear device and set it off in new york or washington or some other city. (instrumental music) >> the president wants $489 billion in defense cuts over ten years. pentagon officials say the goal is to create a smaller, flexible force that can fight traditional wars and mount special operations. >> now that we know the threats that are out there, where is our money being spent? >> the congressional budget office had an estimate that they put the total u.s. spending for defense at $699 billion. now, that is 20 percent of all federal spending, that is more than half of all discretionary spending. it's a substantial commitment to the united states. >> we spend less and less of our defense dollars on things that actually defend us. fifty percent of our defense budget goes to personnel. much of that personnel is bureaucratic personnel manning various defense department sites. >> currently much of the money is going to conventional needs, personnel, r and d and nuclear weapons. >> the congress debated the issue of replenishment of our stock or at least making certain it was okay and
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